Subject Area: Gender Studies

A COMPARISON OF THE SOCIAL, RELIGIOUS, AND GENDER ROLE ATTITUDES OF CATHOLIC AND PROTESTANT WOMEN IN THE REPUBLIC OF IRELAND: Twenty-First Century Ireland From a Woman’s Perspective
 Craven, Florence E.V.
2010 0-7734-3787-8 364 pages
This study is unique in that it analyzes the attitudes of a female sample stratified according to religious tradition (Catholic/Protestant). The sample was also stratified by age (21-45/46-70 years) and location (rural/urban). Irish sociological, social psychological and feminist scholarship has produced diverse work concerning many facets of Irish women’s lives, but little research has specifically focused on the attitudes of Irish Protestant and Catholic women as distinct groups.

Price: $239.95


Feminist Analysis of Gender and Primogeniture in French Neoclassical Tragedy
 Worley, Sharon
2012 0-7734-2583-7 364 pages
In the tradition of Virginia Woolf’s “In Search of a Room of One’s Own,” this study traces the origins of French feminism to Neoclassical theatre and the court of Louis XIV. Through feminist revisionist histories of French literature, the Neoclassical plots and female archetypes from Racine’s Phedre and Andromache, Voltaire’s Brutus (Catherine Bernard) and Marmontel’s Belisarius (Stephanie Genlis) were transposed by women writers and patrons onto actresses and the queens, empresses and mistresses of the French ruling dynasties from Louis XIV- to Napoleon at a time when women were denied the rights of citizenship. Women authors include Bernard, Genlis, Olympe de Gouges and Germaine de Staël, among others. Arguing that emerging feminism is a function of historicism that defines female identity through parallel constructs between regency and theatre, Neoclassicism and modernity, authors of an emerging body of French feminist writings ineluctably reconcile sadist and pacifist incongruities between gendered roles in tragedy.

Price: $239.95


Fraternal Male Twinship in History, Society, Fiction, and Entertainment
 Chishty-Mujahid, Nadya Q.
2021 1-4955-0927-3 116 pages
In this book Dr. Chishty-Mujahid expands her earlier works to focus on fraternal male twinship. She offers a helpful biobliography in the area of twin studies and a discussion about theories concerning twin relations.

Price: $119.95


Stigma and Perseverance in the Lives of Boys Who Dance: An Empirical Study of Male Identities in Western Theatrical Dance Training
 Risner, Doug
2009 0-7734-4661-3 216 pages
This study investigates the competitive world of pre-professional Western concert dance training and education in the U.S. as experienced and lived by boys and young men, an under-represented population in the field. This work examines the discourses of professional dance preparation through theoretical and narrative approaches that combine to illuminate the highly gendered professional dance world as evidenced through the minds and bodies of male adolescents and young adults.

Price: $179.95


Stigma and Perseverance in the Lives of Boys Who Dance: An Empirical Study of Male Identities in Western Theatrical Dance Training (softcover)
 Risner, Doug
2021 1-4955-0924-9 216 pages
With a Foreword by Ramsay Burt. This book addresses the fact that "a lack of scholarly attention has been paid to this burgeoning research area in the U.S., especially in terms of book-length studies."
While research on the topic of boys who dance is scant, the author states that "what we do know, though tentative, provides cause for concern, linked as it is to dominant notions of masculinity, pervasive homophobia, and boys' neglect, harassment, and social isolation."

Price: $49.95


The Rabbinic Discussion About Bat Mitzvah Celebrations: Girl Puberty Rites in Judaism
 Fishbane, Simcha
2017 1-4955-0540-5 100 pages
Author examines girl's puberty rites or rather the lack of such rites in rightwing Orthodox circles. The historical beginnings and cultural impact of the Bat Mitzvah and its development in Israel and the United States are explained.

Price: $99.95


Why Jewish Women are not Permitted to Work on the Festival of Rosh Hodesh: An Anthropological Explanation
 Fishbane, Simcha
2017 1-4955-0618-5 64 pages
Dr. Fishbane's monograph explores the cultural and theological reasons behind the Jewish ritual of not allowing women work on the festival of Rosh Hodesh. Rabbinic Judaism is patriarchal in nature and the ritual appears to be an exemption to cultural norms.

Price: $79.95


Woman's Transformations. A Psychological Theology
 Hammett, Jenny Yates
1982 0-88946-918-0 120 pages
Hammett unravels the many strands of liberal theology in an attempt to understand a literalized Father God. Essays include "Sin and the Image of the Feminine," "Creation and the Female-Male Image," "Goddesses as Symbols of Feminine Consciousness," and "Imaginal Consciousness: The Bridge Between."

Price: $119.95


Women and Politics in Japan and Korea
 Shin, Youngtae
2004 0-7734-6374-7 208 pages
This book is about the role of women in Korean and Japanese politics over the past century. It is exceedingly rare to have a comparative analysis of politics in Japan and the Republic of Korea, which gives this book a special status. At the same time these are countries with remarkably low levels of political participation by women, so it is very important to have an analysis of the reasons for this outcome. In the 1970s women accounted for less than two percent of legislative representatives in Japan, and less than one percent in Korea; today women constitute about seven percent of the members in each legislature, but these levels are still comparatively low in the developed world: about forty-three percent of Sweden’s legislators are women, and women constitute more than 30 percent of Germany’s Bundestag; the level in the U.S. Congress is about thirteen per cent.

The explanation for this phenomenon is by no means simple, and the author traverses a complex argument beginning with the “late” industrialization of both countries, followed by long periods of military rule and excesses of nationalism in both that until relatively recently subordinated women to state-sponsored goals of rapid development and national unity, to the situation today where, at least in Korea, the role of women in politics is growing rapidly. Her account is based on numerous interviews in Korea and Japan, a deft use of public opinion polls, and a wide comparative reading in the literature on the history and politics of both countries. After examining a host of theoretical and conceptual approaches to understanding the role of women in politics, she combines an historical analysis with an examination of patriarchal culture in Japan and Korea, and then scrutinizes the way in which the two respective political systems have both formal and informal mechanisms that militate against women’s participation. Furthermore at many points in the text she makes comparative judgments concerning women’s participation in Europe and the United States.

Both Korean and Japanese history in the early 20th century were marked by women who fought multiple battles on several fronts: to get any recognition at all outside the demands of the home, to fight discrimination against any woman who would dare challenge the suffocating society-wide support for family-based patriarchy, to suffer ostracism for joining socialist groups (which tended to more open to women) or for living lives independent of men (for which they were labeled promiscuous and even a threat to national unity). Ichikawa Fusae, the founder of Japan’s Women’s Suffrage League in 1924, suffered much ridicule from the society for decades, only to be forced into supporting Japan’s wars in Asia. Korea was then a colony, not a nation, but from the early point of the massive March First Movement in 1919 right down to the present, when thousands of civic groups and NGOs co-exist in Korea’s strong civil society, women have often been the leaders of protests. This sharp contrast with Japan makes for one of the most interesting aspects of this book.

Her discussion of how the postwar Japanese political system excludes women (without necessarily intending to do so) is also particularly illuminating. The Liberal Democratic Party, in power continuously since 1955 (with one brief interruption in 1993), is made up of factions which resemble one-man political machines or groups, with strong ties of patronage and favoritism in the local areas. These virtually all-male informal networks of patron-client ties, reinforced by male bonding rituals in drinking houses all over Japan, represent a formidable barrier to the entry of women into political careers. Even civic and grass-roots organizations seeking progressive goals tend to be run by men in Japan.

On the other hand, the largest number of women representatives in the history of the Republic of Korea is seen under the system of the Revitalization Congress. However, given the nature of the Congress at the time, one can hardly say their representation had much to do with the peoples’ will. Ironically though, the long history of the dictatorial military regimes gave Korean women the opportunity to hear their own political voices, and through their participations in anti-dictatorial protest movements they gained political experiences necessary to engage in politics in the future. She interviewed and observed many women involved in grassroots political organizing; their future seems to be a comparatively bright one compared to women in Japan, who still have not found a route to significant participation in the world’s second-largest economy.

Price: $179.95


Women in Celtic Law and Culture
 Thompson, Jack George
1996 0-7734-8760-3 352 pages
This study presents a global view on the early Celtic experiment in gender equality, focusing on pre-Roman Celtic groups (Celtiberi, British, Gaulish) as well as the six major Celtic societies which survived into the Middle Ages (Breton, Cornish, Irish, Manx, Scottish, and Welsh). Employing an interdisciplinary approach, it avoids parochialism by cross-referencing, where possible, Pagan, secular Christian, and Christian Church authors. In the cases of conflicts in dates, all sides of the conflicts, and types of evidence from such varied disciplines as archaeology, history, women's studies, anthropology, classical studies, comparative law, economics, linguistics, political science, and psychology are cited.

Price: $239.95


WOMEN IN CHINA: Current Directions in Historical Scholarship
 Guisso, Richard
1981 0-88946-151-1 248 pages
Thirteen essays on foot binding, female infanticide, widow remarriage, the Taoist androgynous ideal, anti-westernization, etc., discussing the cultural, economic, political, and historical factors which contributed to the emergence of Chinese womanhood of today.

Price: $179.95


Women’s Literary Salons and Political Propaganda During the Napoleonic Era: The Cradle of Patriotic Nationalism
 Worley, Sharon
2010 0-7734-3835-1 564 pages
In 1800 Napoleon Bonaparte sought to impose an absolute political authority as First Consul for life, and emperor in 1804. A network of women authors connected with Germaine de Staël in Paris, Coppet, Berlin, and Florence maintained salons and addressed political conflicts in their novels, correspondence and theory. Nationalist histories, also written by salon members, reinforced their unified political agenda by emphasizing the heroic acts that guaranteed national freedom. Semiotics became the primary means of political propaganda and persuasion in the absence of legislative debate and women’s suffrage.

Price: $319.95


Working-Class Students at Radcliffe College, 1940-1970: The Intersection of Gender, Social Class, and Historical Context
 Duffy, Jennifer O'Connor
2008 0-7734-5098-X 232 pages
This book explores the experiences of working-class students in higher education at Radcliffe College during the years 1940-1970. More specifically, this work examines how the mid-point of the twentieth century’s changing social, political, institutional, and economic forces influenced the undergraduate and alumnae satisfaction levels and post-graduate career paths of working-class students.

Price: $179.95